climate.uvic.ca

This page summarises the pictures used on the front page of the UVic Climate Modelling Group website. Click on the picture to see a larger version and (sometimes) more information.

The images used on the front-page (and linked below) of the UVic Climate Modelling web site are free for non-commercial use under the terms of this license unless otherwise noted on the page with the image.

2014

September, 2014,

Standing on the Alberta, British Columbia border looking southwest into North Kannanskis Pass from the shore of Maude Lake you see Mount LeRoy (2970 m) and other peaks in Kotenay National Park.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: A. Arts

August, 2014,

This is a view of the sunrise on July 2, 2014 as seen from a camp site near the Brandberg in west-central Namibia. The proximity to the coast brings modest amounts of moisture allowing cumulus clouds to form if updrafts are present. These clouds will quickly dissipate as the day warms.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: B. Johnson

July, 2014,

Rimouski sunset (June 2014). A somewhat distinct glitter path is visible where the sloped faces of waves aligned along a path between the camera and the sun. Other wave patterns are apparent as are cloud shadows, especially at centre right.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: B. Tencer

June, 2014,

This is the view northwest from Mt. Erskine, Saltspring Island, BC, Canada. Mt Erskine reaches to (approximately) 440 metres elevation. The large body of water is Stuart Channel with Vancouver Island (Crofton) on the left and Saltspring Island in the foreground and on the right. Penelakut Island lies in Stuart Channel at centre right.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

May, 2014,

Here's the view northeast from Mt Douglas in Saanich, British Columbia. The Saanich Peninsula stretches away on the left. Cordova Bay and Haro Strait open up with a view to many of the the southern Gulf Islands and more distant mountains rising above Vancouver.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Cloud Iridescence seen from a BC ferry near Denman Island

April, 2014,

Cloud iridescence can occur when clouds are thin and composed of water droplets with a similar size. Diffraction causes light of similar wavelengths to be bent around droplets of similar size. Where those size occur together and where the geometry of the sun, cloud, and viewer are appropriate the colours are selected and become prominent.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Mt Douglas-PKOLS in snow. Saanich, BC, Canada

March, 2014,

Mt Douglas-PKOLS, Saanich, British Columbia is a hill in Saanich, BC that reaches to 213 m above sea-level. It rises directly from the ocean (Haro Strait) in the north. This is the view of the tree covered flank of the hill. Its peak is lost in cloud and swirling snow flakes.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

The view looking north across the harbour, Victoria, BC, Canada

February, 2014,

Victoria Harbour, British Columbia. Looking north over the harbour on a cool but typical January day we see cirrostratus and cirrus clouds over still water. The iconic "Blue Bridge" at image centre will be gone soon, replaced by a newer model that designers hope will be admired in years to come.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

A circumzenithal Arc over Greater Victoria, BC, Canada

January, 2014,

This is not a rainbow. It's a circumzenithal arc seen over Greater Victoria, BC. It occurs when light from the sun (below the arc) refracts through the face and edge of thin plate-like ice crystals high in the atmosphere.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

2013

Strait of Georgia sunrise

December, 2013,

Sunrise seen from Glencoe Cove Park in Saanich, British Columbia. The view is approximately to the southeast and the peaks are coastal mountains in Washington State, USA.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Peace River at Site C

November, 2013,

Photo of a mid-river island important for animal migration and breeding in the Peace River Valley at the location where the Site C dam will be constructed.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: A. Weaver

Sunset lit clouds evoke flames

October, 2013,

Brilliant colours from the setting sun suggest clouds made of waves of flame. This image was taken in the grounds of Craigdarroch Castle in Victoria, BC, Canada.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Meuller Glacier, New Zealand

September, 2013,

The Mueller Glacier in Aoraki/Mt. Cook National Park in New Zealand. The photographer's own comments are available on her blog.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: K. Alexander

Gulf Islands View

August, 2013,

This is the view, looking north-northeast, from Mt. Douglas in Saanich, British Columbia. In order of appearance (distance) we see D'Arcy Island (10 km), Sidney Island (12 km), Stuart Island (23 km, USA), Saturna Island (34 km), and finally some mountain peaks north of Coquitlam and Maple Ridge, BC (approximately 135 km, if anyone can identify the specific peaks let us know but some guesses are Hatchery, Vickers, Tingle, Osprey which all reach up to ∼1700 m elevation).

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Georgeson Island, British Columbia

July, 2013,

This is Georgeson Island in the Strait of Georgia, British Columbia, Canada. It is just south of Mayne Island, part of the southern Gulf Islands. The other forested slopes in the distance are Samuel and Saturna Islands. This view is basically looking in the opposite direction from the image used for August, 2012. The Strait of Georgia proper is to the left (east) in this image.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Cowichan Valley farm

June, 2013,

Farm fields in the Cowichan Valley lie under a typical spring sky with recently cut hay drying in the sun. Farms across Canada are working hard to get early crops harvested or planted as spring slowly changes to summer.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

A desertified landscape in Arizona and New Mexico

May, 2013,

The Navajo Indian Reservation of northern Arizona and New Mexico has undergone large scale desertification as a result of sheep and cattle grazing and subsequent wind erosion. As a result, infrequent heavy precipitation such as that pictured here has easy access to erodible shales, resulting in dramatic sheet and gully features and the exposure of dense deposits of Triassic fossilized wood. It is ironic that desertified landscapes under very dry climates often display the most striking examples of water-based erosion.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: J. Fyke

Campus of the University of Victoria (UVic) at dusk

April, 2013,

This picture shows the campus of the University of Victoria (UVic) seen at dusk from the top of Mt. Douglas. The distance from the camera to the campus is approximately four kilometres. The distance between the peaks of the houses in the Lam Family Student Housing Complex on the far left of the image to the lights inside the large windows in the Visual Arts Building is about one kilometre.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Wild Canada Geese flying

March, 2013,

March brings spring* and spring brings wholesale change to high latitude environments. Animals that fled cold regions as winter approached begin to return to take advantage of the short growing season.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

*Northern hemisphere only.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Foggy Day, VIctoria, British Columbia

February, 2013,

Fog seen on Mt. Tolmie in Greater Victoria, British Columbia. Tiny water droplets make up this cloud. They are of the order of 1 to 10 micrometres which is a least ten times smaller than the human eye can easily discern. So, individually invisible, the water drops do become visible on mass because of their effect on light. Through a process called Mie Scattering visible light, which has wavelengths about ten to one hundred times smaller than the water droplets, is scattered in all directions leading the fog to appear white and preventing us from seeing too far into it.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

thin film interference from oil on water

January, 2013,

Thin film interference is a visually spectacular phenomenon of optics that unfortunately depends in this case on an environmentally damaging event. Spilled oil on wet pavement spreads out in a thin film on top of the water. The layer of oil gets progressively thinner as you move out to the edge of the spill. The presence of the thin film of oil means there are two reflective surfaces separated by a narrow (thin) gap. The light reflected from the top of the oil and water layers interferes, constructively and destructively, with itself.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe


2012

wilhelmina bay, antarctica

December, 2012,

Wilhelmina Bay, Antarctic Peninsula. The kayaking group were able to explore this large bay in beautiful weather, with a humpback whale for company at the end of the paddle.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: B. Garrett

wastwater lake, cumbria, england

November, 2012,

Wastwater Lake in Lake District National Park, England on a day with light fog.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: C. Wright

October, 2012,

This is the view looking south from East Sooke Park on Southern Vancouver Island over the Strait of Juan de Fuca. Water upwelling in the strait and flowing in from the Pacific in the west (the right) keeps the surface water cold. Humid air blowing over this cold surface often results in foggy conditions that can fill the entire length of the strait.

spanish point, Ireland

Credit: R. Matthews

spanish point, Ireland

September, 2012,

This is Spanish Point, Ireland. The Atlantic Ocean is to the right and Ireland is to the left. The clouds massed along the edge of land are caused by convergence of winds which, after flowing over the relatively smooth ocean, are forced to slow down and rise upon encountering the rougher terrain over land.

Credit: E. Wiebe

anniversary island, british columbia

August, 2012,

This is Anniversary Island. It's located at the south end of the Belle Chain Islets and is part of Gulf Islands National Park Reserve.

Here's a google map of the area.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Canada Day Flag photo

July, 2012,

Happy Canada Day! You are looking north over Haro Strait from the BC Ferry (Queen of Cumberland) on the run to the Pender Island(s). The double hump in the middle at the bottom of the picture is Galiano Island and Mayne Island is off to the right

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

haleakala maui

June, 2012,

This is the view from Haleakala, the volcano that forms most of the island of Maui, one of the Hawaiian islands. The barren landscape reflects the island's volcanic origins. The peaks of this volcano reach to about 3000 m above sea-level.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: A. Weaver

in the clouds

May, 2012,

This image, taken on the Strait of Georgia shows two kinds of mirages. A towering mirage stretches objects vertically while a superior inverted mirage shows near surface objects upside-down as though reflected.

Click the image for a larger version and more information.

Credit: E. Wiebe

in the clouds

April, 2012,

Just one small cumulus changes the scene if it happens to be be between you and the sun.

Credit: E. Wiebe

in the clouds

March, 2012,

A remarkable photograph taken from an airplane while flying among the clouds. Sometimes a different perspective helps to understand a physical phenomenon better.

Credit: Rüdiger Nehmzow

Summer in Tasmania

January/February, 2012,

Summertime at last. That is, summertime if you live in the southern hemisphere. We northerners tend to forget that people living south of the equator experience the seasons the other way around. We tend to view this as a quaint anachronism and a good opportunity for travel to somewhere warm when it's cold and dark in the north. Really though, there is no reason but history for one season to be the preferred summer and the other not. So, to honour our friends south of the equator, let's celebrate summer in Tasmania.

Credit: K. Kvale


2011

Mt. Washington, Vancouver Island, Winter ski view

December, 2011,

The view from a Mt. Washington ski slope looking out over Strathcona Provincial Park on Vancouver Island. Early snow and seasonal forecasts suggest that this will be a very snowy winter on BC ski hills.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Orange Maple Leaves

November, 2011,

Orange maple leaves against a blue sky. Complementary colours marking the transition to the rainy season (winter) here in Victoria, BC.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Pastel scene

October, 2011,

Progressively more distant objects illustrate an interesting phenomenon in early morning light. Intervening sky-glow colours each layer in the scene with more light causing this gradation of tones.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Prairie View

September, 2011,

Late summer on the prairie near Rathwell, Manitoba. It's difficult to imagine a more perfect day: blue sky, yellow crops, puffy cumulus, and a rustic barn.

Credit: R. Wiebe

Brilliant Dam on the Kootenay River

August, 2011,

The Brilliant Dam supplies 265 megawatts of electric power for British Columbians.

Credit: A. Weaver

Helbronner Glacier at Mont Blanc

July, 2011,

This is the view, in late spring, from the Funivie Monte Bianco. The main peak in the image is Aiguille Verte which towers over the Helbronner Glacier. Mont Blanc is under and behind the camera.

Credit: R. Wania

Dramatic image of Space Shuttle Launch

June, 2011,

The Space Shuttle Endeavour launching on its last mission, through a layer of altostratus clouds.

Credit: NASA

Dramatic skies over Island View Beach, Saanich Peninsula, British Columbia

May, 2011,

Spring time means unstable, changeable weather patterns. This photo (looking south) shows rain clouds moving in from the west on an otherwise mostly sunny, windy day at the end of April. There is a small patch of mammatus clouds in the centre of the frame where cold, moist air is descending in billows.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Loss Creek Woods, Juan de Fuca Provincial Park, British Columbia

April, 2011,

This photo, from 30 March 2011, shows a patch of rainforest at Loss Creek, Juan de Fuca Provincial Park, British Columbia.

Credit: E. Wiebe

View over Gordon Head, Saanich, British Columbia

March, 2011,

Looking east from Mt. Douglas in Saanich toward San Juan Island (USA). Rare snowy conditions and (not so rare) stormy skies invest the view with dramatic possibilities.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Ice fractures on Lake Winnipeg

February, 2011,

It should come as no surprise that Lake Winnipeg freezes over in the winter. This picture shows fractures in clear ice, approximately 15 cm thick, near shore on Lake Winnipeg (at Victoria Beach).

Credit: K. Roberts

Tuktoyaktuk light pillars

January, 2011,

Light pillars in Tuktoyaktuk, Northwest Territories on the winter solstice, December 2010. The pillars appear to rise vertically above bright, exposed light sources but are caused by ice crystals in the atmosphere between the viewer and the light source. They seem to converge because of the optics used and perspective effects. In the distance is the partially eclipsed moon and an aurora.

Credit: F. Anderson

2010

Solar rays

December, 2010,

Looking at the sun hidden behind cloud cover we see rays. They are apparent because the atmosphere is not perfectly clean, clear air. The rays are parallel but appear to diverge from the sun because of perspective.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Antarctic Iceberg

November, 2010,

This photo was taken from the MV SA Agulhas, the South African Antarctic resupply vessel, during the annual resupply voyage in 2005.

Credit: N. Swart

Alaska aurora

October, 2010,

In this painterly image, made in mid-September, green aurora shine above Willow Lake and the Wrangell and Saint Elias Mountains in eastern Alaska, USA.

Thanks to Paul Alsop for the use of the image.

Smoke blankets the central South American landscape.

September, 2010,

Smoke from agricultural burning and natural forest fires cloaks central South America. Swept southward by a strong flow in the atmosphere the smoke dramatically illustrates the effect of the Andes mountains on atmospheric circulation.

Summer in Greece.

August, 2010,

Summer in Greece.

Credit: A. Weaver

All sky view over Victoria

July, 2010,

This is a nearly all sky view over Victoria. A few small alto-cumulus are visible but otherwise high cirro-cumulus, and other cirrus clouds spread across the sky. Some repeating features indicate the presence of wave phenomena.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Montana Moment

June, 2010,

A spectacular moment in late spring in Montana, USA.

Credit: C. Brennan

Kinds of Ice in Greenland

May, 2010,

Ice plays an important role in the climate system. This image, of the east coast of Greenland, shows a wide variety of ice. On land, fast-flowing outlet glaciers originating from the Greenland Ice Sheet calve icebergs into the ocean. Sea-ice (formed from the freezing of seawater) exists as land-anchored shelves, large multiyear rafts and small chunks that are caught within the eddies of the south-flowing East Greenland Current.

This image was the NASA Earth Observatory Image of the Day for 2 April, 2010.

Cumulus Cloud Shadow Victoria British Columbia

April, 2010,

Looking east we see the shadow cast on a lower layer of clouds by a towering cumulus illuminated by the morning sun. This photograph was made on 1 April 2010.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Spring Victoria British Columbia

March, 2010,

It is traditional in Victoria to annoy the rest of Canada with images of spring flowers. In fact there is an Official web site. 2010 has certainly been no different. We have experienced an extremely mild winter and blooms are abundant.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Mt. Washington British Columbia

February, 2010,

Snowy landscape at Mt. Washington, British Columbia.

Credit: R. Wania

Gulf Islands British Columbia

January, 2010,

The view south from Galiano Island in the southern gulf islands of British Columbia. The gulf islands lie between Vancouver Island and the North American continent. They are approximately equally divided between Canada and the USA. Click the image at left to see more.

Credit: E. Wiebe



2009

Tar Sands

December, 2009, Copenhagen Special Image

Dealing with global warming means transforming our energy systems away from carbon-based fuels. Is this really such a bad thing?

Copyright: A. Weaver

Martian Dust Devil Trails

December, 2009,

Dust devils on Mars leave evidence of their passing. The lighter red dust on the surface is disturbed by the swirling vortices exposing the darker material beneath.

Credit: HiRISE, MRO, LPL (U. Arizona), NASA

Leaf Litter

November, 2009,

It's autumn again in the Northern Hemisphere. The topic this month is leaf litter. Click on the image at left to read more.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Chaitén Chile

October, 2009,

Chaitén is a volcano on the west coast of South America in Chile. It experienced a major eruption on 3 May 2008 that has been ongoing until now. This image was acquired on 27 September 2009.

Credit: NASA EO-1 team

Rainbow Bridge, Niagara Falls

September, 2009,

The Rainbow Bridge crosses the Niagara River below Niagara Falls. This photo was taken looking north along the river from within the cloud of mist rising over the canadian portion of the falls, called the Horseshoe Falls.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Cirrus Clouds

August, 2009,

Cirrus in the sky above Salt Spring Island. These whispy cirrus clouds are composed of ice crystals in the highest part of the troposphere. The clouds form into streaks as these crystals fall into regions with faster (or slower) wind speeds.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Sarychev peak volcanic eruption from space

July, 2009,

Sarychev Peak is an active volcano in eastern Russia on the Kuril Islands. This eruption, photographed from the International Space Station on 12 June 2009 shows many features of interest. You can see ash and steam clouds mixed to various degrees. There is a ground hugging pyroclastic flow. Condensation at the top of the column forms a sort of cap (pileus) cloud. A hole in the stratus clouds covering the peak has been created by the rising column of hot gases and ash, either from the shockwave of the eruption or because air is sinking next to the rising column. Diffused ash from a previous eruption can be seen at high altitude at the left of the photo.

Credit: NASA

Strait of Georgia Clouds

June, 2009,

This view looking east over the Strait of Georgia shows two distinct cloud types. High cirrus composed of falling ice crystals form a distinct mare's tail high in the troposphere. At the same time converging westerlies aided by surface convection and flow over the coastal range form billowing cumulus clouds at eastern boundary of the strait.

Credit: E. Wiebe

Saanich Inlet Fog

May, 2009,

Saanich Inlet is seen here covered by a heavy layer of fog.

Credit: E. Wiebe

ISS

April, 2009,

The International Space Station (ISS) on 25 March 2009 seen against the sun and the limb of the Earth.

Credit: NASA

Dawn over Victoria BC

March, 2009,

Cold northerly wind flows off of Greenland causing cloud streets over the relatively warm ocean. Karman vortices spin off of Jan Mayen island where it impedes the flow of air. Tendrils of sea ice are also visible where the ice drifts off shore.

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

12 February, 2009 -- Special,

Charles Darwin was born on the 12th of February in 1809. Today would be his 200th birthday. Darwin was certainly not the only scientist of the 19th century to contribute to our understanding of evolution. However, his book, On the Origin of Species is perhaps the most important scientific work of that century. The power of the theory of evolution to explain so many wide-ranging features of biology is truly amazing. Darwin deserves to remembered for the impressive and thorough work he did to explain this important natural process.

February, 2009,

Dawn over the city of Victoria with the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountains in the background.

Credit: E. Wiebe

January, 2009,

Victorians like to say that it doesn't snow here. The truth is that it does snow once or twice per winter. This year we received about 30 cm of snow over a two day period just after the winter solstice. The snow was accompanied by two weeks of colder than normal temperatures.

Credit: E. Wiebe


2008

December, 2008,

Snow melts first on surfaces that conduct heat faster and absorb more solar radiation. In this case the stones making up the path have more energy available to melt the snow than the surrounding grass and soil. This early morning snowfall accumulated quickly on ground that was still relatively warm. All of it had melted by late afternoon of the same day. This is typical of snowfalls in Victoria.

Credit: E. Wiebe

November, 2008,

Hurricane Norbert reached category 4 status in early October 2008. It was an eastern Pacific hurricane and made landfall on the Baja peninsula of Mexico on the 11th of October. It soon weakened to tropical storm status. The photo, taken by the MODIS instrument on the Aqua satellite, is from 8 October 2008. Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

October, 2008,

This picture illustrates two common causes of fog. Steam fog is rising over the distant body of water and radiation fog has formed over the cool flat areas in the foreground.

Credit: E. Wiebe

September, 2008,

Strong winds gusted over the Gulf of Mexico on December 16, 2007, and though the wind is invisible in these photo-like snapshots, its presence is written in the clouds and on the surface of the water.

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

August, 2008,

The 'Spouting Horn' is a double lava tube on the south shore of Kauai (Hawaii) that shoots sea water 15 metres into the air while making a moaning sound. We tried to link this, however tenuously, to climate but in the end we are putting it up because it's cool.

Image Credit: D. Nelles

July, 2008,

A Tiger Swallowtail butterfly searches for nectar on July blossoms.

Image Credit: E. Wiebe

June, 2008,

On May 19, 2005, NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit captured this stunning view as the Sun sank below the rim of Gusev crater on Mars. This Panoramic Camera mosaic was taken around 6:07 in the evening of the rover's 489th Martian day, or sol.

Image and text credit: NASA/JPL/Texas A&M/Cornell

May, 2008,

This picture shows water beading on a young conifer cone. The surface tension of water combined with the hydrophobic properties of the scales on the cone prevent the drop from spreading. This drop was close to the maximum size possible in these conditions (from brief observation). This cone is 18 mm long with scales about 2 mm across.

April, 2008,

Anna's Hummingbird is a year round occupant of Victoria so we admit that it's not really an honest indicator of spring. In the morning they start coming to the feeders as soon as the sun rises, when they wake from torpor. Though humans don't experience torpor, the arrival of spring with longer days and sunnier skies may induce an equivalent reaction.

March, 2008,

This dull grey picture depicts a typical northeast pacific beach scene in midwinter. Stratus clouds and rain squalls predominate the weather. Fortunately spring is on the way and blue skies will soon begin to make an appearance.

February, 2008,

The rugged New Zealand Southern Alps lie on the Alpine Fault, between the Pacific and Indo-Australian tectonic plates. During the austral summer months, low stratospheric ozone levels result in vivid colors as a result of high levels of incoming ultraviolet radiation. Sunscreen is mandatory. Credit:  S. Fyke

February, 2008, Special,

Walter Munk recently visited UVic. One member of our group, Paul Spence, couldn't resist the opportunity and asked Dr. Munk to autograph his surfboard.

January, 2008, Credit: NASA Earth Observatory

The Mackenzie River in the North West Territories is Canada's longest river. Near its mouth in the Beaufort Sea it flows across a wide delta dotted with lakes, ponds and minor tributaries. The permafrost that underlies the delta is changing rapidly as the arctic climate warms.

NASA Earth Observatory, Mackenzie River Delta



2007

December, 2007, Saturn's third largest moon Iapetus has a fascinating appearance. Not only does it have a strange walnut-like shape but its surface is dramatically two-toned. One face of the moon, Cassini Regio, is dark and the other, Roncevaux Terra, is as white as new snow. The difference in albedo (reflectivity) of the surface is striking. When Giovanni Cassini first observed it in 1671 he noted that it disappeared from view for half of its orbit and correctly guessed its two-toned nature.Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, SSI, JPL, ESA, NASA

Click on the image for more information.

November, 2007, This photo shows a breathtaking display of noctilucent clouds above the waters of the Yukon River, near Whitehorse in the Yukon Territory of Canada. It was captured approximately 2:00 a.m. July 24, 2007. These fascinating clouds are our planet's highest, occurring at altitudes of about 80 km. Credit: D. Cartier.

October, 2007, A brief rain shower made conditions perfect for this rainbow to appear over the southern Gulf Islands in British Columbia. Click on the picture for more information. Credit: E. Wiebe.

September, 2007, This is one of a small group of wind generators on the Bruce Peninsula between Lake Huron and Georgian Bay in Ontario. Credit: E. Wiebe.

August, 2007, A rain shower moves over Lake Winnipeg on a windy day in July. Credit: E. Wiebe.

July, 2007, Tornadoes Strike Northern Wisconsin. This image from the NASA Earth Observatory is from 7 June, 2007. It shows the path of a tornado that passed over the Wolf River in Wisconsin, USA. The resolution of the image is about 30 m per pixel which means that the path of desctruction ranges between approximately 150 m and 720 m wide. The entire path was 64 km long.

Credit: NASA Earth Observatory.

June, 2007, The shadow cast by a mountain shows clearly how much matter is suspended in the atmosphere. This photo was taken in the morning along Highway 1, near Hope BC. Credit: C. Avis.

May, 2007, The setting sun illuminates a complex arrangement of high cirrus clouds with a contrail or two visible as well. Credit: E. Wiebe.

April, 2007, The arrival of spring in the northern hemisphere means that plants begin to grow again. The chlorophyll bloom occurs on land, with the production of new leaves, and in the ocean, with the growth of new phytoplankton. Credit: E. Wiebe.

March, 2007, An Atlantic puffin (Fraticula Artica) on Runde Island, Norway. Breeding statistics for sea birds can be used as early indicators of climate change. Hopefully the puffin is not our canary in a global coal mine. Credit: M. Eby.

February, 2007, Unusually large amounts of rain and generally stormy weather lead to flooding in some parts of southern Vancouver Island. Credit: E. Wiebe.

January, 2007, A jet engine contrail highlights a zone of shearing winds in the atmosphere. Credit: E. Wiebe.



2006

December, 2006, Garry Oaks on Christmas Hill in Victoria after a snowfall. Credit: E.&20nbsp;Wiebe.

November, 2006, On a cold morning (-3.5°C) "steam fog" from the still warm Swan Lake in Victoria is advected across a neighbouring meadow by a gentle morning breeze. Credit: E. Wiebe.

October, 2006, A brave climate scientist discusses global warming with Darth Carbon.

October, 2006, Ice crystals in the upper atmosphere create halos by refracting and reflecting sun light. A contrail apparently pierces this halo. Also visible is the shadow of the contrail cast onto the underlying cirrus clouds. Credit: E. Wiebe.

September, 2006, Contrails are mixing clouds created when the hot exhaust of a jet engine is injected into the cold atmosphere at high altitude. This picture also illustrates what the sky looked like over Victoria for much of the summer of 2006. Clear and blue. We are not much looking forward to the rainy season. Credit: E. Wiebe.

August, 2006, Mount Baker in Washington state (USA) is silhouetted by the rising sun. Volcanoes (this one is -mostly- dormant) contribute to climate change through their emissions and can cause both warming and cooling. Credit: E. Wiebe.

July 2006, Tiny phytoplankton in the sunlit surface water west of Vancouver Island bloom when when wind and surface ocean currents cause nutrient-rich deep water to rise to the surface. Credit: NASA.

June 2006, This sunset picture illustrates how diffraction of light in the atmosphere can produce spectacular images. High ice crystals create the coloured fringes and atmospheric layers with different properties distort the shape of the sun. Credit: C. Avis.

May 2006, One of the sure markers of the arrival of spring, a dozen newly hatched ducklings learn to forage with their mother. Recently, studies have shown changes such as hatching behaviour in geese and migratory behaviour of other birds that can be attributed to warming climate. Credit: E. Wiebe.

April 2006, The winter of 2005/2006 was the warmest Canadian Winter on record. There is a trend in the record of the last 50 years toward warmer winter temperatures.

 March 2006, This the view looking south from Mt. Douglas in Victoria, BC. The city of Victoria, the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the Olympic Mountains are all visible. The sky is dominated by fractocumulus in the foreground and orographically forced cumulus at the horizon. Credit: E. Wiebe
 February 2006, View of cloud structure over Johnstone Strait taken from the sea shore at Qualicum Beach, Vancouver Island. Credit: A. Weaver
 January 2006, This image from the NASA Earth Observatory shows a lee wave formed by wind flowing over Amsterdam Island in the southern Indian Ocean.


2005

 December 2005, Frost feathers on a cold morning. This frost formed on a car windshield overnight. Ice crystals grow initially along scratches and defects in the glass. Further growth occurs preferentially on older crystals forming this dendritic (branching) growth pattern.
 November 2005, French Beach Provincial Park is located near the mouth of the Strait of Juan de Fuca on the southwest shore of Vancouver Island. On this particular late October day a heavy fog settled over the beach and neighbouring woods.
 October 2005, Rays of sunlight, caused by obstructing clouds, are made visible because of particles suspended in the atmosphere. They are made dramatic by the geometry of perspective.
 September 2005. Lichen covered beach boulders in an area of Sweden called Höga Kusten (High Coast). This former beach is now several hundred metres above sea level due to isostatic rebound since the retreat of ice from the High Coast 9 600 years ago. The uplift so far is approximately 285 m, which is the highest known rebound. The land is still rising at about 1 cm/year. Credit: M. Eby
 August 2005. In the far north permafrost effectively seals the ground. Recently however, warming in the arctic (here, Siberia) has reduced the permafrost, allowing water to escape from some of the small lakes that cover the landscape. The right side of this image was captured in 1973, the left in 2002. The lake bisected by the yellow line has shrunk considerably in 30 years. For more information about these Landsat photos see the Earth Observatory site or click on the picture at left.
 July 2005. These flowers (Brodiaea coronaria) were photographed in summer at Gowlland Tod Provincial Park near Victoria BC. The park stretches along the eastern side of Saanich inlet. It has some wonderful meadows and a variety of wildflowers. Summers in Victoria are typically very dry and by late summer the grasses in the meadows have turned brown.
Victoriaweather.ca temperature contours. June 2005. www.victoriaweather.ca is now online.
Campfire in British Columbia's coastal mountains. June 2005. Biomass burning, such as forest fires, has always been a natural process that contributes gases such as carbon dioxide and methane to the atmosphere. Click the picture for more information. Credit: J. Fyke
A dew covered spider waits for the rising sun to dry its web. May 2005. A dew covered spider waits for the rising sun to dry its web. Credit: E. Wiebe
Goldstream Park in Victoria is covered in moss April 2005. Goldstream Park near Victoria, British Columbia is famous for an annual salmon run, Niagara Falls, and a generally moist environment. The cool, wet winters and the fact that the site is quite shaded in the summer ensure that almost every tree and rock are covered in moss. Credit: E. Wiebe
elbow river kananaskis alberta

March 2005. Mist fills the bottom of the Elbow River Valley in Kananaskis Alberta. Credit: S. Legault

icebergs aground in South America

February 2005. Looking West over Lago Grey, Torres del Paine, March, 1997. These icebergs calve from glacier Grey, a minuscule offshoot of the massive Southern Icefield (Campo de Hielo Sur). Credit: R. Wiebe

Pine Grosbeaks visit a feeder at -40C

January 2005. Pine Grosbeaks (pinicola enucleator) visit a feeder in Whitehorse, Yukon Territory. That these little birds can survive outside at -40°C is amazing. The male is the one with the red head. The females have yellow caps. Credit: R. Lewis


2004

Mt. Harmston, Moving Glacier and Milla Lake, Vancouver Island, British Columbia December 2004.

Looking down on the Moving Glacier, Milla Lake and Mt. Harmston. Moving Glacier is one of many small glaciers on central Vancouver Island. The peak of Mt. Harmston is 1982 metres above sea level. Credit: H. Johnson

changing colours of maple leaves in the fall November 2004. The longer nights of autumn trigger biochemical processes which cause leaves to change colour. Some years, when late summer and early autumn conditions are ideal, leaf colours in certain parts of Canada can be truly remarkable. Credit: R. Wiebe
[Fog on West Sombrio Beach, Juan de Fuca Trail, Vancouver Island, British Columbia.] October 2004. This picture was taken in the early evening on Sunday, 26 September at West Sombrio Beach on the Juan de Fuca Trail. Fog is just a cloud that occurs at ground level where we can experience it more intimately than usual. For fog to occur the atmosphere must be at or below the dew point temperature. In the picture the fog is located over a river valley and the presence of an additional source of moisture there and the generally still and humid conditions were enough to raise the dew point locally to the atmospheric temperature. Credit: A. Bähr
[Victoria British Columbia Harbour in summer.] September 2004. We previously showed you what an extreme winter weather event looked like in Victoria. This picture shows a more pleasant day in Summer. Victoria Summers are typically warm and dry (compare to other Canadian cities), perfect for tourists and, occasionally, other visitors. Those are the cloud covered tops of the Olympic Mountains in Washington State peeking out behind the trees in the distance.
[Lilioceris lilii -- Red Lilly Beetle] August 2004. The Red Lilly Beetle (Lilioceris lilii) is a Eurasian species imported into Canada in the 1940s. It is a "pest" species with few local predators. It feeds extensively on the leaves of native and cultivated lillies. This photograph was taken in July in a garden in Hull, Quebec. Credit: R. Wiebe
[Sand dune, Sossusvlei, Namib Desert, Namib-Nauklaft Park] July 2004. View across Sossusvlei from Dune 45, Namib Desert, Namib-Nauklaft Park, Namibia. The dunes here reach over 200 m in height. Water manages to flow into the large basin of Sossusvlei every ten years on average. The trees at the bottom of the dune are about 5-10 m high. Credit: D. Stone
[Flowerpot Island, Georgian Bay] June 2004. Flowerpot Island in Georgian Bay is home to geological formations called "flowerpots". The combined action of waves and changing lake levels wear away the weaker parts of sedimentary formations leaving behind these mysterious structures.
[Olympic Mountains] May 2004. The Olympic Mountains in Washington State seem to loom over Victoria at sunrise. The Olympics cast a significant rain shadow over the Strait of Juan de Fuca. This greatly benefits Victoria and the Gulf Islands, creating summer conditions that are typically sunny and dry.
[Spring Flowers] April 2004. The miracle of Spring returns. Of course, here in Victoria, Spring doesn't really appear miraculously. In fact it almost seems that it has been here since December.
[Rideau Canal skating in Ottawa, Canada] March 2004. In winter - yes, Ottawa still has winter in March - the Rideau canal becomes a 7.8-kilometre slice of ice through the heart of Canada's Capital. Beavertails, snow suits and ice skates abound. Credit: R. Wiebe
[Victoria Harbour with ice! It doesn't happen very often but this past January Victoria enjoyed a brief cold snap.  Needless to say Victorians are pretty overwhelmed by even this much winter.  Credit: E Wiebe] February 2004. It doesn't happen very often but this past January Victoria "enjoyed" a brief cold snap. Needless to say Victorians are pretty overwhelmed by even this much winter.
[Sun in ultraviolet light.  Credit:  SOHO Team/NASA] January, 2004. The sun in ultraviolet light. The sun is the external source of energy for the Earth's climate. The incoming shortwave energy that is absorbed by the Earth is reemitted as longwave radiation so that the net energy balance of the Earth is zero. Internally to the Earth's climate system feedbacks act between different components (e.g. ocean, atmospere, ice etc.) and the result is the climate that we observe. It sounds so simple doesn't it?
This image was taken from the SOHO website.

2003

Vancouver, This view, looking north over downtown Vancouver, was taken from Vancouver City Hall on 29 December 2002.  The coastal mountains are visible in the distance while Vancouver lies under a blanket of stratus clouds.  Credit: E Wiebe December, 2003. NOTE: The UVic Climate Modelling Group is not located in Vancouver. We are in Victoria. Victoria is not the same as Vancouver. It is much smaller and drier, sunnier and slightly warmer. Victoria is on Vancouver Island which is not where Vancouver is.

This view, looking north over downtown Vancouver, was taken from Vancouver City Hall on 29 December 2002. The coastal mountains are visible in the distance while Vancouver lies under a blanket of stratus clouds.
Bands of low cumulus are coloured orange by the setting sun while higher cirrus clouds are still lit by more full spectrum light.  This picture was taken facing southwest at sunset in the middle of October, 2003.  Credit: E Wiebe November, 2003. Bands of low cumulus are coloured orange by the setting sun while higher cirrus clouds are still lit by more full spectrum light. This picture was taken facing southwest at sunset in the middle of October, 2003.
It's officially autumn again<sup>**</sup>.  In most parts of Canada the changing colours of the leaves signal the approach of winter.  In Victoria however, we look forward to the grass growing again. ** note: northern hemisphere only.  Credit: E Wiebe October, 2003. It's officially autumn again**. In most parts of Canada the changing colours of the leaves signal the approach of winter. In Victoria however, we look forward to the grass growing again.

** note: northern hemisphere only.
This image shows the major fires in southern British Columbia, Canada on 21  August 2003.  The fire season this year has been the worst in the province's  history.  Many of the largest fires were near populated centres and hundreds  of houses were destroyed along with the forest.  Credit: Terra Satellite. September, 2003. This image shows the major fires in southern British Columbia, Canada on 21 August 2003. The fire season this year has been the worst in the province's history. Many of the largest fires were near populated centres and hundreds of houses were destroyed along with the forest.
The badlands of southern Alberta.  This picture was taken in Dinosaur Provincial Park, one of the richest sites of dinosaur discoveries in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage site.  It is part of the Palliser Triangle, a particularly dry part of the Canadian Prairie. Credit: E Wiebe August, 2003. The badlands of southern Alberta. This picture was taken in Dinosaur Provincial Park, one of the richest sites of dinosaur discoveries in the world and a UNESCO World Heritage site. It is part of the Palliser Triangle, a particularly dry part of the Canadian Prairie.
The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite senses temperature using infrared wavelengths.  This image shows the temperature of the Earth's surface or clouds covering it.  Image courtesy AIRS Science Team, NASA/JPL, by way of the Earth Observatory. July, 2003. The Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) instrument aboard NASA's Aqua satellite senses temperature using infrared wavelengths. This image shows the temperature of the Earth's surface or clouds covering it. Image courtesy AIRS Science Team, NASA/JPL, by way of the Earth Observatory. Click here or on the image for more information.
Vancouver Island suffers from mild, wet winters and springs.  Lush growth surrounds you if you hike along the (http://www.env.gov.bc.ca/bcparks/explore/parkpgs/juan_de_fuca/) Juan de Fuca Trail on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island.  Credit: D. Stone. June, 2003. Vancouver Island suffers from mild, wet winters and springs. Lush growth surrounds you if you hike along the Juan de Fuca Trail on the southwest coast of Vancouver Island. Credit: D. Stone.
April showers bring May flowers.  That is certainly true in Victoria where in March and April of 2003 unusually high spring rains have produced an abundance of new green growth and many flowers.  Our (http://www.crd.bc.ca/water/watersupplyarea/summary.htm) reservoir has never been so full. May, 2003. April showers bring May flowers. That is certainly true in Victoria where in March and April of 2003 unusually high spring rains have produced an abundance of new green growth and many flowers. Our reservoir has never been so full.
Stormy weather over the Strait of Juan de Fuca with the Olympic mountains in the distance.  Credit: E Wiebe April, 2003. Stormy weather over the Strait of Juan de Fuca with the Olympic mountains in the distance. Credit: E. Wiebe
Hikers getting an early start on the Coleman Glacier, as Jupiter rises above Mount Baker, Washington, September 2002.  Credit: D Stone. March, 2003. Hikers getting an early start on the Coleman Glacier, as Jupiter rises above Mount Baker, Washington, September 2002. Credit: D Stone.
Arctic ice with meltponds in the early morning, Norwegian Bay, Queen Elizabeth Islands, Northern Canada, August 2002. <i>Credit: J Dumas</i>. February, 2003. Arctic ice with meltponds in the early morning, Norwegian Bay, Queen Elizabeth Islands, Northern Canada, August 2002. Credit: J Dumas.
Morning Mist along the Kettle River valley in southeastern British Columbia.  Credit: E Wiebe January, 2003. Morning Mist along the Kettle River valley in southeastern British Columbia.

2002

Frosty leaves on a cold November morning.  A high pressure system was keeping the sky cloud free and still for several nights in a row.  The result:  early morning temperatures below zero at ground level.  Credit: E Wiebe December, 2002. Frosty leaves on a cold November morning. A high pressure system was keeping the sky cloud free and still for several nights in a row. The result: early morning temperatures below zero at ground level.
Tattered cumulus clouds stretch over a hill top in Cranbrook British Columbia.  The old town reservoir, and good trout fishing lie beneath.  Credit: E Wiebe Clouds, October 2002. Tattered cumulus clouds stretch over a hill top in Cranbrook British Columbia. The old town reservoir, and good trout fishing lie beneath.
This is one of a class of plants called xerophytes which are well adapted to living in hot dry climates.  Several species of sedum are common in southwestern British columbia where they grow on exposed rock faces in poor soil conditions.  This is believed to be sedum album.  It grows clusters of tiny white flowers in the early summer.  Credit: E Wiebe Sedum, September 2002. This is one of a class of plants called xerophytes which are well adapted to living in hot dry climates. Several species of sedum are common in southwestern British columbia where they grow on exposed rock faces in poor soil conditions.

This is believed to be sedum album. It grows clusters of tiny white flowers in the early summer.

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